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P.A.M.E.L.A. – New Trailer and Release Date

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“Many believed that true utopia could not be achieved. They were right.” – P.A.M.E.L.A.

In NVYVE Studios’ P.A.M.E.L.A., players will assume the role of a cryogenically frozen Sleeper of the futuristic city of Eden. When Eden’s citizens become afflicted with a progressive and painful bone condition that causes them to act erratically, PAMELA, the city’s caretaker AI, wakes the Sleeper to assist. Unlike zombies, the Afflicted will exhibit more complex┬ábehaviours, will need to sleep and eat and will consume resources around the city.

In environments such as night clubs and malls, the player will wield a variety of unconventional weaponry and use advanced technology to bio-augment their own bodies while exploring the city. The player will need to scavenge for food and water while searching for over 200 available lootable items. In addition to the Afflicted, the player will also encounter other factions such as security droids and robotic custodians.

Utilising such devices as force fields and turrets, as shown in the trailer, the player can build a defensible base from which to explore the city for clues as to what happened to cause the downfall of Eden.

P.A.M.E.L.A. - AARM device
Not your father’s Pip-Boy! The AARM – P.A.M.E.L.A.’s inventory and map interface system.

Visually inspired by games like Mirror’s Edge and Mass Effect, NVYVE Studios explores themes of human nature and bio-augmentation in ways inspired by Bioshock and Deus Ex. The game has also been thematically compared to System Shock 2.

NVYVE Studios’ P.A.M.E.L.A. will be released into Steam Early Access for PC on March 9th.

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Scott Crawford
Born at the dawn of the video game era, Scott continues to strive for complete mediocrity in video game playing. Whether looking up hints on a wiki, or reading up on Reddit, Scott knows the importance of not missing that bobblehead on the first play through. Having no voice for video, Scott has turned to writing as a form of expressing his love of video games. When he's not watching a let's play video, Scott collects burn scars on his arm at his day job as a chef.